Greece brutalized by more austerity

Posted: November 8, 2012 in Austerity, Economy, Euro, Europe, Financial crisis, Global financial crisis 2.0
Tags: , ,

Now that the election is over, the ongoing crisis in Europe is back front and center — if it isn’t on your radar, it should be. That’s because all the “solutions” so far have merely kicked the can down the road a bit farther. Meanwhile, as politicians negotiate, meet and talk, actual people are suffering. More.

Nowhere is this more evident than in Greece, which is about to be further brutalized by more austerity as the government just passed another multi-billion austerity package to keep the Euro’s leaders sweet. The bailout funds will keep rolling in, but at a steep price. If nothing else tells the story of the toll austerity is taking, this horrible photo of a riot police officer engulfed in flames should.

Protestors rioted in vain against this latest round of austerity, which looks to be the worst yet. More spending cuts will weaken the already frayed social safety net as tax increases will hit the poorest the hardest and labor reforms will allow further exploitation of workers. All this is happening with a backdrop of Greece entering its sixth year in a row of economic contraction with more than 25 percent of its population out of work.

The leader of the radical left main opposition Syriza party blasted the government for “leading the Greek people to catastrophe and chaos.” The government clung to the fact that these cuts will keep Greece in the Euro, which they believe is better than the alternative. Better for whom? The political and economic elite, no doubt, but not the unemployed, poor and disenfranchised, who make up an increasingly large share of the Greek populace.

I don’t see any good outcome for all of this. All the bailouts are doing is bailing out European banks, who could go under, bringing the entire financial system down with them a la Lehman Brothers. While I certainly don’t relish the idea of another global financial crisis, I really wonder if any kind of meaningful change is possible without one. The grip that the banks have on the political and economic leaders of the West is truly a stranglehold one, and I’m not sure what it would take to break it.

No regulatory reforms have succeeded in denting that power and it doesn’t look like the West has the political will to break the too big to fail banks and make the changes in the system necessary to restore some balance of power between the haves and the have-nots. No wishful thinking in the form of the granting of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Leaders of the Euro Zone or the G-7 leaders monitoring the crisis will have much of an impact. So, onward we go, with some type of economic crisis or catastrophe all but inevitable.

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Comments
  1. Great blog, Amy! Unfortunately, I tend to agree with you on the likely hood of a global financial crisis. My gut sense is it could be initiated by much smaller, and totally unanticipated financial events. Do world leaders truly know all the complex, and largely unregulated, financial investment instruments? What if Congress goes crazy and cannot extend the debt ceiling? And last, the U.S. housing market remains in a weakened state. Could just a little downturn reverberate through the global financial community?

    I think we will find out how much in denial governments are very shortly.

  2. […] As a deficit reduction and economic policy, austerity never made any sense. It’s ridiculous to think that by cutting budgets in a time of economic recession, you can shrink budget deficits in the future, ultimately increasing economic growth. The policy defied common sense; unfortunately, the powers-that-be fully embraced it, to the misery of countless millions in Europe and here in the U.S. I’ve written about it previously, in a post two years ago entitled Austerity = Suffering and last year, Greece brutalized by more austerity. […]

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