Posts Tagged ‘wealth management’

All bets are off in the race for financial services AUM in about five weeks, when hedge funds and private equity companies formally gain the right to market directly to potential clients. That’s when the provisions of the JOBS Act that lift the ban on hedge fund and private equity advertising become effective. These rules were formally approved about a month ago by the federal Securities and Exchange Commission.

There’s been a lot of speculation about exactly what hedge funds and private equity companies will do when they can advertise and market, which could be anything and everything including:

  • Celebrity endorsements
  • Billboards
  • National advertising campaigns
  • Direct mail and email solicitation
  • Fancy dinners, conferences and seminars

It’s all likely, but what hasn’t been discussed as much is the impact of the entrance of extremely well funded entities who are set up to compete with financial advisors, financial services companies and asset managers for a limited pool of high net worth, ultra high net worth and institutional assets. There’s a limited pool of these assets, and competition is already fierce among companies that have the right to directly market and advertise today.

Imagine what it’s going to be like in a few years when extremely well funded hedge funds really get their arms around what they can do and hire the brightest and the best Mad Men to formulate and execute a marketing strategy for them. While all healthy financial services firms have money to burn to a degree, hedge funds charge fees far in excess of what other asset managers can charge and they also have the ability to lock up AUM so that it can’t flow out in the same way that it does with mutual funds and financial advisors.

If you are currently seeking to gather AUM, you better watch out. These guys are coming and they have the ability to suck all the air out of the room so that there is even less space for other messages. In an already noisy atmosphere, it will be even harder for potential clients to distinguish your message from all the others out there.

That means if you don’t have a clearly defined ideal client type and a plan to attract those clients to you, you better get moving. Time’s a wasting…..

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coke.photoConnecting with potential clients by telling your story in an engaging way through content marketing is the way to go today. It may not be easy to envision exactly how content marketing can work for you or what’s happening in the space. Here are some examples of great content marketing innovation and links to blogs and sites that can help you imagine and explore the boundaries of what you can create for your financial advisory practice via content marketing.

At the American Society of Journalists and Authors Conference last week, I learned about companies that are innovating in this space, including:

  1. Coke: Last Fall, Coke relaunched it’s website as Coca-Cola Journey, a digital magazine. Instead of focusing on static branding and information, the site provides interactive info that tells the story of Coke via a variety of channels including bloggers offering thought leadership and a ton of cool content marketing in a variety of formats from video to social media to infographics. This interview with Ashley Brown, director of digital communications and social media for Coke, published by the Custom Content Council, focuses on Coke’s story and how it is told through the new site. 
  2. IMB: Midsize Insider is a digital interactive content site designed to offer information to small businesses about technology issues that affect them and potential solutions. IBM is not pushing it’s own products and instead has hired thought leadership bloggers in the space and journalists to tell it’s story. The site covers a number of topics in a variety of formats, including mobile, social business, cloud computing, business analytics and security.

Check these sites out and think about what they are doing — they are offering a wide variety of content in different formats. While your financial advisory business isn’t likely to have the ability to match the depth and breadth of these offerings, they are a good example of what can be done and may encourage you to think creatively and outside the box.

stopsignYesterday I explored how a fundamental aspect of content marketing — storytelling — can benefit your financial advisory business. Alas, regardless of how compelling your story is, your efforts to reach your target audience will be stopped dead in their tracks if you can’t get it in front of them.

That’s where distribution comes in. And that’s why, even if you don’t have content ready to distribute, you need to get your distribution channels up and running. Here’s an overview of the major types of distribution channels and why they’re important:

  • Social media: Now that the compliance barriers are falling and more clients and potential clients than ever are on social media channels, there is really no excuse not to be there. That being said, not every channel is for every financial advisor. Some are more friendly to specific audiences and types of marketing than others. Facebook, for example, is a great way to connect with clients on a personal level and find out what their day-to-day concerns are. LinkedIn is the top professional network where you can find out about promotions and job changes. Twitter is the leading issues-oriented platform. There’s nothing wrong with picking one of these and focusing your efforts there for a while before broadening your approach. The one tool you must use, in my opinion, is blogging. More on that next week.
  • Website: To distribute content effectively, your website has to engage visitors and have the infrastructure to support that content. This includes the ability to create landing pages for specific types of content and gather information about visitors who want to read your content. You need someone — whether that is in your office or a contractor outside — who can create landing pages and help you gather the information you collect so that it resides in your client relationship management system (CRM)
  • Search Engine Optimization: Closely related to your website, you need to make it easy for potential clients, influencers and the media to find you. By using keywords and optimizing your site, content and social media, you can make it as painless as possible for people to find you and learn more about what you offer.
  • Email Marketing: Even if you aren’t engaged in content marketing yet, you likely have hundreds of email addresses, if not more, of clients and potential clients. E-mail marketing campaigns using the content you’re going to create are an extremely effective method for engaging with prospects and converting them into clients.

To get ready to engage with prospects via content marketing, do whatever you need to do to get your website upgraded and looking good, even if it’s just updating the copy to make sure it reflects what you do today. Keep tabs on Google analytics to see who is visiting your site when and check various search engine terms to see where you rank. Beef up your social media profiles or at least pick a platform and establish a presence if you aren’t there.

Tomorrow, I’ll continue this series on content marketing with a look at helpful resources.

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As the landscape for marketing changes inside and outside the financial services space, content marketing is becoming increasingly important in differentiating a brand and offering potential customers and clients the opportunity to interact with you, your company and your ideas before signing on.

I’ve been a convert to the content marketing philosophy for a while and am now even more convinced that it’s the way to go in the wake of attending the American Society of Journalist and Author’s Conference last week. The content marketing panels were excellent, and I learned about a number of companies, including IMB, Coke and Nike, that are pursuing innovation in this space.

The point of content marketing isn’t to sell potential clients on why they should hire you as their financial advisor. The point is to offer your thought leadership so you are perceived in the marketplace as an authority on specific issues who understands a specific client demographic and offers appealing solutions.

But for content marketing to be effective, it must tell a story. And that story must be framed by a well defined brand. The more specific the brand, the better the story.

When you focus in on an ideal client type and draw a very detailed picture of that client, that type of client is one that you know — or should know — inside and out. Typically, that client type is one that you know well and have interacted with for years, so you have the ability to understand their situation and offer tailored solutions to their problems and challenges.

What niche you occupy doesn’t really matter as long as you have one and it’s well defined. A recent slideshow in at financial-planning.com identified eight successful advisor niches; there are many more.

When work inside a very specific niche, creating a content marketing campaign is, or at least should be, a piece of cake. That’s because you know your audience so well that you can easily think of issues that concern them, which are exactly the areas that you should be creating blog posts, white papers, case studies, commentaries, articles and social media posts around.

When distributed widely and consistently, that kind of content will attract clients to you. It will also cut the conversion process because the clients who do get in touch will be doing so after they know something about you and are interested in learning more.

It’s exciting for me as a journalist with knowledge of the financial advisory space that content marketing is coming of age because it offers me so many opportunities to help my clients shape compelling narratives to help their clients and potential clients. That’s why they are in business in the first place — to help people achieve financial security.

In my blog posts this week, I’ll focus on other aspects of content marketing and how it can help you frame your story and attract clients to you. Stay tuned.

For decades, the backbone of the financial advisory industry has been small Main Street type practices, where a solo advisor assisted by an employee or two picked investments and handled financial planning for his neighbors and businesses in the community. Many of those advisors were brokers employed by a major wirehouse firm, and there was a lot of pride and strength in that association.

But as Financial Planning Magazine reports this morning, an almost paradoxical trend of getting smaller to get bigger is playing out and will accelerate in the industry during the next five years. This involves more break-away brokers, those who previously were at large wirehouses, going independent and forming their own firms. The most successful of those firms are successfully scaling and growing larger and are poised to continue to do so, gobbling up some smaller players in the process.

These larger firms have the capacity to not only offer the products and services that wealth, savvy clients expect, but also to handle the increased regulatory demands being placed on advisors. The smallest practices, those with $40 or $50 million in assets under management, will be under more pressure as fee pressures, regulatory demands and the appetite for wealth management rises.

Here’s what I see as the implications of these trends:

  1. The smallest firms will need to either scale up and add staff and capacity, be in a better position to be acquired by a large firm needing their expertise or location or risk eventually going out of business — the “Darwinism” the article refers to.
  2. Break-away brokers will have more choices than ever before among service providers who can truly understand their business model and offer the services to help them launch and scale rapidly. Players in this space include High Tower, Dynasty and Securities America, notes the article.
  3. Middle-sized RIAs who aren’t scaling need to embrace this trend or risk getting left in the dust and shrinking rather than growing.
  4. Wirehouses continue to suffer a brain drain that could damage their capacity to attract discerning high net worth clients, as it is getting more and more attractive for the best talent to leave at a time when wirehouse brands inspire less and less trust and struggle with profit margins and staffing.